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Parental Guidance

 
The gift of your guidance: God could have made children completely self-sufficient when they left their mother’s womb, but he didn’t. They need us.
Children desperately need adults for guidance. They need direction and assistance from those of us who have already walked down the road.
If you hiked through the Swiss Alps, it would be far easier, less dangerous, and more fulfilling to have an experienced guide lead you. He would show you features that you would normally miss and he would warn you about difficult parts of your journey. That’s what every kid needs.
Children also need to learn from your mistakes and your past pain. They can learn from their own experiences, but they can also avoid a lot of unnecessary pain by learning from your experiences. It’s wiser and faster to learn from the experiences of others. God never wants you to waste your mistakes and hurts. He wants you to use them to help others. When you see others go down a path you personally know is a dead end, speak up! It’s the loving thing to do.
Even if you’re not a parent, kids need you in their lives, and you need them! Kids teach us to think of others and be less self-centered. You will teach them, but they will also teach you in many ways. For instance, you can teach them self-control and they can teach you spontaneity and creativity. Right now, are there any children in your life that you are
helping?
When you consider that the teen years are a period of intense growth, not only physically but morally and intellectually, it’s understandable that it’s a time of confusion and upheaval for many families.
Despite some adults’ negative perceptions about teens, they are often energetic,
thoughtful, and idealistic, with a deep interest in what’s fair and right. So, although it can be a period of conflict between parent and child, the teen years are also a time to help kids grow into the distinct individuals they will become.
Many kids announce the onset of adolescence with a dramatic change in behavior around their parents. They’re starting to separate from Mom and Dad and to become more independent. 
At the same time, kids this age are increasingly aware of how others,
especially their peers, see them and are desperately trying to fit in. Their peers often become much more important, as compared with their parents, in terms of making decisions.
Kids often start “trying on” different looks and identities, and they become very aware of how they differ from their peers, which can result in episodes of distress and conflict with parents.
 
Educate Yourself
• Read books about teenagers.
• Think back on your own teen years.
* Remember your struggles with acne or your embarrassment at developing early — or late.
• Expect some mood changes in your typically sunny child, and be prepared for more conflict as he or she matures as an individual.
• Parents who know what’s coming can cope with it better. And the more you know, the better you can prepare.
in adolescence, direction, guidance, leading, parental conflict, parenting, teach, teen years, wisdom
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